For weeks, we have been espousing the importance of being involved in the local municipal and school budget processes. The decisions being made today are very much going to dictate how communities fare in the days and months to come. The pandemic has shifted priorities, and put fresh emphasi…

It has been interesting to watch the Raider debate unfold around Rutland. The push to change the mascot has been met with equal parts support and opposition. Those in favor of the change are firmly planted in the camp of seeking social justice, arguing the imagery can be perceived as insensi…

The election cycle in many communities across Vermont has taken some unusual twists this town meeting season. It seems indicative of our times.

The impeachment trial in the Senate has put us back in thick partisan weeds again. And as has become our way, we are casting aspersions — from both sides — like live grenades.

You encounter people around Vermont who still have had not had to cope with a COVID-19 death. Almost a year into the pandemic most of us have known someone who had COVID, for sure. There are others who kept on despite symptoms (a bad idea, by the way). And then there are those who are being …

This is and edited version of what the Kaiser Health Network had to say about re-exposure to COVID:

It is alarming to see that the number of COVID cases is not going down. We have been banking on the opposite. We are looking to have the economy restart. We are looking forward to local winter sports. We were hoping the vaccine distribution would start to stem the flow of cases.

It is unfortunate that a matter of days into Black History Month, racism made headlines in Vermont again.

In recent days, several letter writers have voiced the opinion that they feel they can breathe more easily with Joe Biden as our 46th president.

In the last few weeks, since the insurrection and the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, these newspapers have received concerning calls and emails. For the most part, the interactions have centered on “the media” being “the enemy of the people.” With that have come some bold reque…

This week, Gov. Phil Scott committed $3 million in the Working Lands program to help farmers, producers, markets and co-ops that make up Vermont’s food system.

Most local and school budgets are being considered or have been approved by local boards in advance of March 2, Town Meeting Day. And in most cases, we know who is running for municipal and school board seats.

Given the fiscal challenges facing the state, we commend the governor for putting forth a budget that touches upon factors that matter to many Vermonters. It would seem that, despite coronavirus and the most divisive political climate in the modern age, this governor and his administration h…

On Monday morning, members of the states press corps got a reality check via email.

For years now, State Treasurer Beth Pearce has served the state of Vermont well.

We never get to say this: “No news is good news.” If we could plaster it across the top of the front page in 80-point type — “Dewey Defeats Truman”-style — we would.

The is what The Los Angeles Times had to say on President Donald Trump, social media and the open internet:

What a week. And now what a weekend.

Amid pleas on these pages, in our communities, across the state and nation, the House of Representatives voted on Wednesday on an article of impeachment accusing President Trump of “incitement of insurrection.” Ten Republicans supported the move, with the final tally coming in at 232-197. U.…

In recent days, Vermont officials have been talking a lot about the ramp-up to a scheduled demonstration in Montpelier set for noon Sunday.

As today's edition can attest, people are upset.

A big thumbs up to Gov. Phil Scott for standing up for the nation and saying President Trump needs to be removed from office — one way or another. It was a bold move on the final day of Scott’s second term. Of course, the vicious hoard that wants nothing other than to see the world burn righ…

“Enough is enough is enough,” said President-elect Joe Biden after his address to the nation Wednesday afternoon as a mob of Trump supporters attempted to seize control of the U.S. Capitol.

There have been incidents appearing in articles and police logs in recent weeks that would suggest that we’re not handling our stress very well. In fact, indications are that we need to take a chill pill.

Late last year, a proposal in Barre City to fly the Black Lives Matter flag in City Hall Park encountered significant resistance. In a series of virtual meetings on the topic, residents seemed to agree that Black lives matter, but some citizens said they couldn’t support displaying a flag as…

Earlier this week, on our news pages we published submissions from local legislators outlining their priorities for the upcoming legislative session which begins Jan. 6. It is an exercise that we do at the start of every session, and definitely at the start of every biennium.

Walt Amses made some enemies this year — he, and a few other regular writers to these pages. They let it be known, in no uncertain verbosity, they were not fans of President Trump. They drew plenty of ire in the form of commentaries and letters to the editor in response.

This is what The Washington Post had to say recently on President Donald Trump’s final month in office:

There are certain books that every Vermonter should have on their bookshelf.

Chances are, if you are reading this, you are one of the thousands of subscribers to either the Rutland Herald or The Times Argus.

This is what the Caledonian Record had to say recently about the Bill of Rights:

It seems pretty clear that the phrase “business as usual” has not applied to 2020. In fact, the pandemic may have changed the business-scape forever.

There is a quote: “Tell me and I’ll forget. Show me, and I may not remember. Involve me, and I’ll understand.” It hails from a tribe unknown. It speaks volumes about about incorporating ideas and wisdom into all conversation. It speaks of a trust in knowledge and an eye toward progress. It e…

This is what the Hartford Courant in Connecticut had to say about a “dead pool” being kept by the Hartford Police Department:

Education matters. Across the state, with remote learning going on at primary and secondary schools, as well at colleges, there is lots of discussion circulating about the quality of education young people are currently getting. No one wants to feel like students are wasting time, not gettin…

This year is Exhibit A when it comes in the trial against critical thinking. As a nation, we are not engaging in meaningful ways; we are not listening to one another; and we are certainly not eager to accept points of view different from our own.

The honor system never really works. And overlaying the honor system onto how we conduct ourselves during a pandemic is a paper tiger.

How many times in the last few months have we written an email or handwritten note to someone stating “in these challenging times”? Probably more than we care to admit.

In the days leading into the holiday, there almost felt like a calm. Perhaps it was both the anticipation of Thanksgiving, as well as the sadness that many families could not all be together.

As we embark on the holiday season in the midst of the coronavirus, our impulse is to do all of our gift shopping online. While that impulse is a good one for the sake of safety, we need to be putting renewed focus on what this pandemic has done to our Main Street.

In many ways, it is hard to give thanks today. But we must.

Five Questions With

Just over three months ago we started “Five Questions With ...” to put a human face to this pandemic. Today marks the final installment in this stage of the project, but it will continue with a new set of questions more focused on Vermont’s recovery. Here, Paul Costello, of Montpelier, offer…

Marlee Brunton, of Middlesex, talks about the pandemic and its effects on her family.

Marlee Brunton, of Middlesex, talks about the pandemic and its effects on her family.

Alayna Martel, of Barre Town, is a registered nurse at UVM Medical Center. She talks about how, as a frontline workers, her life has been affected by the pandemic.

Alayna Martel, of Barre Town, is a registered nurse at UVM Medical Center. She talks about how, as a frontline workers, her life has been affected by the pandemic.

Gayle Townsend-Lang, of Rutland, works full time wearing many hats for the Rutland City Public Schools as “Miss Gayle.” Here she talks about how she has been affected by the pandemic.

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Yankee Notebook columnist Willem Lange, of East Montpelier, talks about how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

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Yankee Notebook columnist Willem Lange, of East Montpelier, talks about how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

CPA Thomas Lauzon, of Barre, discusses how his life has been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation. Earlier this spring Lauzon was named to the governor’s Economic Mitigation & Recovery Task Force.

Chrispin White, of Rutland, discusses how he has been adapting to self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting him.

Chrispin White, of Rutland, discusses how he has been adapting to self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting him.

Christina Sweet, of Rutland, discusses how she and her family have been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation over these months.

Christina Sweet, of Rutland, discusses how she and her family have been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation over these months.

Educator and Vermont Mountaineers General Manager Brian Gallagher, of East Montpelier, discusses how the pandemic has affected his life. Earlier this spring, the Mountaineers’ organizers announced they would cancel the 2020 season.

Cat Heatley, of Rutland, talks about how her life has been affected by the pandemic in recent weeks.

Cat Heatley, of Rutland, talks about how her life has been affected by the pandemic in recent weeks.

Barre Partnership Executive Director Tracie Lewis talks about self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting her life.

Montpelier writer Thomas Greene discusses how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

Drew Smith, of Rutland, talks about self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected his life.

Jessica Van Orman talks about her experience in self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected her life.

Artist Jen Rondinone, of Rutland, reflects on self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected her and her family.

Mark Breen, the “Eye on the Sky” guy from the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury, shares his thoughts in self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting his life.

Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe discusses how self-isolation and the pandemic have affected his life.

Executive Director of the Paramount Bruce Bouchard, of Rutland, talks about how his life has been affected by the pandemic and its consequences.

Executive Director of the Paramount Bruce Bouchard, of Rutland, talks about how his life has been affected by the pandemic and its consequences.

WDEV radio talk show host Dave Gram, of Montpelier, talks about the pandemic and how it has been affecting him and his life.

WDEV radio talk show host Dave Gram, of Montpelier, talks about the pandemic and how it has been affecting him and his life.