We have received some interesting calls and emails in recent days from readers who have been irritated by content appearing on these pages.

The United Nations is going after methane emissions in the effort to slow climate change. Vermont’s cows have nothing to worry about.

Years ago, one of our editors stumbled upon a notice in an old, yellowed newspaper that was in response to a mother whose son wanted to get into newspapering. The editor responded thusly: “If he can say 'no' without making people mad, and 'yes' without making himself mad; if he can write in …

This week’s walkout at the University of Vermont should send three clear messages: Rape culture won’t be tolerated; individuals who commit sex assaults need to be held accountable; and institutions need to do everything they can to keep such atrocities from happening — at any cost.

We find ourselves in a fun game of Whack-a-Mole.

It was a good speech. It was not a fireside chat, but it was as close as President Joe Biden was going to come during a global pandemic. He reassured us that “America is on the move again.”

May 1 is Green Up Day. It is as much of a tradition in our little state as Town Meeting Day. It is an important moment each year, when community comes together again to celebrate what makes Vermont so special.

It was a big week in climate-

A bipartisan group of lawmakers, including U.S. Sens. Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders, has proposed banning police from buying access to user data from data brokers, including ones that “illegitimately obtained” their records.

The announcement that President Joe Biden is set to raise taxes on the rich to fund child care and education in his American Family Plan is a bold step toward a course correction that the nation has needed for far too long.

“It feels like a new day in America.” That is how one Minneapolis resident described the conviction of Derek Chauvin on Tuesday for the murder of George Floyd.

So if you had more than $1 billion to invest in Vermont, where would you do it?

This week, a chrous of Vermont medical organizations and health care leaders urged Republican Gov. Phil Scott and the Vermont General Assembly to denounce proposals to restrict access to gender care.

For many years now, our newspapers have been produced with high-speed internet connections. We call it “the cloud.” Thanks to that technology, our journalists consistently have been able to work remotely during this pandemic, gathering information and logging onto Zoom meetings in order to p…

We commend Sens. Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders in joining the bid to get the federal government out of the fossil-fuel business.

This pandemic has been hard on every Vermonter — some more than others.

There are so many questions right now about the best order in which to restart the economy. The priorities are different from state to state.

We commend members of the Vermont House of Representatives for unanimously passing a resolution formally apologizing for the state government’s role in the eugenics movement of the early 20th century.

Honestly, people, what is wrong with our state? We thump our chests in pride over being the “first” to take action when it comes to human rights, political correctness and social justice. We claim to be a very educated and “woke” state. We say we are tolerant and inclusive.

A letter to the editor we received over the weekend brought to light several issues we feel need to be addressed. First, it is worth noting that the letter will not be validated in print as the various attacks served no purpose other than to malign certain individuals in the community.

It is Easter weekend. Because of the pandemic, it is not a traditional holiday weekend.

The Los Angles Times had this to say on several bills throughout the U.S. looking to ban transgender students from competing in girls’ sports on all school levels:

After months of back-room consideration, there will be a plan announced to begin charging a fee on Vermonters who leave uninspected and unregistered vehicles that are in plain sight of our public roads. The plan — a Junker Tax — would have two consequences: to clean up the Vermont landscape …

We may be at a once-in-a-generation position to do something about poverty in this nation.

The pandemic has changed how we see the world — literally.

No one seems too excited about the U.S. Postal Service plans to achieve financial sustainability announced this week.

Most of us are thinking ahead to gardens, lawns, and spring and summer projects. It’s like that every winter, but this winter felt more acute with the pandemic outside the door, adding to the chill in the air.

The Senate did the right thing by giving approval to S.15 — a bill to make it easier for eligible Vermont voters to participate in elections.

We still have work to do as a newspaper and as a member of the mainstream media. The system remains broken, but not of our doing. You, as readers, suffer.

This is what the New York Times had to say about the F-35:

How are you feeling? A little sluggish? And you’re only three days into daylight savings time, where you lost just one precious hour? (Although, we are all into 12 months lost to the coronavirus.)

This week marks the anniversary of the lockdown caused by COVID-19 that has come to reshape our lives. Now, with a “new normal” well established, we look forward to getting back to a semblance of our year-ago lives.

With the landmark $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill clearing the Senate and House hurdles, it just needs President Biden’s signature — likely to come on Friday — to become a major triumph for Democratic priorities and a showcase of the unity they’ll need to for future success.

It has been a tragic winter, a tragic pandemic.

With all of the seriousness going on in the world these days, it is nice when some levity falls from the sky, so to speak.

Here in Vermont, we are coming off the one week of the year that is democracy in one of its purest forms: Voters chart the course for towns and school districts for another year.

Waste not, want not, as the saying goes.

Were those high winds that ripped across the region actually the winds of change?

It’s Town Meeting Day. You know because we’ve got muddy roads, there is sap flowing, and the snowbanks are starting to show why we need Green Up Day. It is like clockwork, this little tradition of ours.

Sarah Galbraith has a story in this week’s Magazine about a local farm changing hands from one generation to the next. It is an inspiring story of young people stepping up.

Between ongoing heating bills, Town Meeting Day doldrums, a national pandemic, Trump’s millions of pages of tax returns, and news cycles that often feel relentless, we needed an out-of-this-world boost.

For weeks, we have been espousing the importance of being involved in the local municipal and school budget processes. The decisions being made today are very much going to dictate how communities fare in the days and months to come. The pandemic has shifted priorities, and put fresh emphasi…

It has been interesting to watch the Raider debate unfold around Rutland. The push to change the mascot has been met with equal parts support and opposition. Those in favor of the change are firmly planted in the camp of seeking social justice, arguing the imagery can be perceived as insensi…

The election cycle in many communities across Vermont has taken some unusual twists this town meeting season. It seems indicative of our times.

The impeachment trial in the Senate has put us back in thick partisan weeds again. And as has become our way, we are casting aspersions — from both sides — like live grenades.

You encounter people around Vermont who still have had not had to cope with a COVID-19 death. Almost a year into the pandemic most of us have known someone who had COVID, for sure. There are others who kept on despite symptoms (a bad idea, by the way). And then there are those who are being …

This is and edited version of what the Kaiser Health Network had to say about re-exposure to COVID:

Five Questions With

Just over three months ago we started “Five Questions With ...” to put a human face to this pandemic. Today marks the final installment in this stage of the project, but it will continue with a new set of questions more focused on Vermont’s recovery. Here, Paul Costello, of Montpelier, offer…

Marlee Brunton, of Middlesex, talks about the pandemic and its effects on her family.

Marlee Brunton, of Middlesex, talks about the pandemic and its effects on her family.

Alayna Martel, of Barre Town, is a registered nurse at UVM Medical Center. She talks about how, as a frontline workers, her life has been affected by the pandemic.

Alayna Martel, of Barre Town, is a registered nurse at UVM Medical Center. She talks about how, as a frontline workers, her life has been affected by the pandemic.

Gayle Townsend-Lang, of Rutland, works full time wearing many hats for the Rutland City Public Schools as “Miss Gayle.” Here she talks about how she has been affected by the pandemic.

Yankee Notebook columnist Willem Lange, of East Montpelier, talks about how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

Yankee Notebook columnist Willem Lange, of East Montpelier, talks about how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

CPA Thomas Lauzon, of Barre, discusses how his life has been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation. Earlier this spring Lauzon was named to the governor’s Economic Mitigation & Recovery Task Force.

Chrispin White, of Rutland, discusses how he has been adapting to self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting him.

Chrispin White, of Rutland, discusses how he has been adapting to self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting him.

Christina Sweet, of Rutland, discusses how she and her family have been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation over these months.

Christina Sweet, of Rutland, discusses how she and her family have been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation over these months.

Educator and Vermont Mountaineers General Manager Brian Gallagher, of East Montpelier, discusses how the pandemic has affected his life. Earlier this spring, the Mountaineers’ organizers announced they would cancel the 2020 season.

Cat Heatley, of Rutland, talks about how her life has been affected by the pandemic in recent weeks.

Cat Heatley, of Rutland, talks about how her life has been affected by the pandemic in recent weeks.

Barre Partnership Executive Director Tracie Lewis talks about self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting her life.

Montpelier writer Thomas Greene discusses how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

Drew Smith, of Rutland, talks about self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected his life.

Jessica Van Orman talks about her experience in self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected her life.

Artist Jen Rondinone, of Rutland, reflects on self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected her and her family.

Mark Breen, the “Eye on the Sky” guy from the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury, shares his thoughts in self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting his life.

Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe discusses how self-isolation and the pandemic have affected his life.

Executive Director of the Paramount Bruce Bouchard, of Rutland, talks about how his life has been affected by the pandemic and its consequences.

Executive Director of the Paramount Bruce Bouchard, of Rutland, talks about how his life has been affected by the pandemic and its consequences.

WDEV radio talk show host Dave Gram, of Montpelier, talks about the pandemic and how it has been affecting him and his life.

WDEV radio talk show host Dave Gram, of Montpelier, talks about the pandemic and how it has been affecting him and his life.