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This is what the Brattleboro Reformer had to say about Vermont strengthening child care and mental health systems:

editor's pick

Two weeks into the legislative session, state leaders have been outlining their priorities for the next few months, taking aim at certain issues and posturing against others. It would appear the mechanization of Vermont politics is well-oiled and ready for business as usual.

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We think most people would agree that the best way to know who the best candidate for public office might be is to hear their answers to the pressing issues of interest.

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We would like to say that we were surprised that the Rutland City School Commissioners voted to reinstate the high school nickname Raiders after retiring it.

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On Monday, schools around the state were closed due to the uptick in COVID positive cases. Several schools also have reported a staffing shortage coupled with the inability to maintain a pool of substitutes has also been a contributing reason.

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Sen. Kesha Ram Hinsdale, of the Chittenden District, has indicated she intends to introduce a ranked-choice voting bill this session that will allow voters to rank the candidates on their ballot in order of preference.

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Discussions about how to address climate change have been ramping up along with the yearly temperature highs. Depending on the source, these discussions are too late to head off catastrophe, are occurring at a crucial juncture or are totally unnecessary.

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It was interesting to hear the range of pundits talking about Gov. Phil Scott’s State of the State address Wednesday. It was scattershot.

Now that the legislative session is underway, the clock to adjournment in May starts clicking. As predictable as clockwork, we expect the State of the State address (this afternoon) by the governor, followed in a couple of weeks by his annual budget address.

This is what The Wall Street Journal had to say recently on population shifts during the pandemic:

This is not a good look for Vermont: Our lawmakers don’t want to return to Montpelier to govern in person until the number of COVID-positive cases has gone down … yet we are fully expecting our educators and kids to be back in school on Monday despite a slapdash attempt to get tests out to f…

It is disheartening that at a time of year when we focus on giving and kindness, we are subjected to a barrage of thoughtlessness and hate.

Earlier this month, West Virginia Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin popped up on Fox News for an interview where he stated he would not be backing President Biden’s “Build Back Better” initiative. With the Senate evenly divided and unified Republican opposition, the dissent by Manchin, barring any…

Next Monday, most Vermont schools are scheduled to return.

With the holidays now upon us, we are eager to slip into our traditional routines.

There are around 7.75 billion people on Earth. There are about 330 million people in the United States. And there are around 623,000 Vermonters.

Over the course of a year, we publish 260 days. Every edition between Tuesday and Friday includes an editorial, an editorial cartoon (usually Jeff Danziger or Tim Newcomb), and an average of four letters or commentaries per day. For the Weekender, we typically have eight commentaries, includ…

Well, omicron crashed the holiday party. That’s a bummer and a half.

No one should live in fear of an intimate partner or family member. And yet it is a daily occurrence for thousands of Vermonters.

The Chicago Tribune editorializes on where were Amazon brass in wake of tornado:

This is what the Bangor (Maine) Daily News had to say recently on how decriminalization of drug possession is working in Oregon, and whether Maine should follow the model:

This is what the Portland Press Herald had to say recently about a Maine lawsuit that gives the religious right an opportunity:

We will sound the old saw: The United States needs a major reform of its political system. A democracy should reflect the will of the people. That has not been happening, and it appears to only be worsening.

The governor is feeling tested these days. He is getting pushback from Vermonters who feel he and his administration are not doing enough to further mitigate the positive cases of COVID that are plaguing some of the state’s schools and municipalities. Then there are those who feel that pushi…

This should come as a surprise to no one, but our news organization doesn’t send a staff reporter to New York City every day to gather the news from Wall Street. They’re too busy covering local news that is more likely to have an immediate and direct impact on you, our reader.

This is what the Kansas City Star had to say about Sen. Bob Dole's spirit of compromise:

The Associated Press this week wrote an article that had legal experts weigh in on the question: If the Supreme Court decides to overturn or gut the decision that legalized abortion, could they undermine other precedent-setting cases, including civil rights and LGBTQ protections?

This is what the Bangor Daily News had to say recently about “forever chemicals” found in deer meat:

Communities across Vermont are wrestling with the decision to mandate mask-wearing in order to help mitigate the further spread of COVID cases in the state.

This is what The New York Times had to say about the abortion debate before the U.S. Supreme Court:

The other day, we received a complaint from a reader that there had been nothing in the newspaper in recent days about the omicron variant of coronavirus. The morning after we published an Associated Press article about the new variant, we received several notices from readers complaining we…

This is a special time of year. The gift of giving brings out the best in people. We strive to be generous and thoughtful to those we care about.

There is an enduring myth that Benjamin Franklin wanted the turkey to be our national bird. The story goes that Franklin thought the turkey — a true native of our land — was more industrious and diligent than the overhyped fish eagle that became our national symbol.

If you’re a regular reader of the Rutland Herald or Times Argus, first, thank you for your support, it’s very much appreciated. Second, as a regular reader, you’re likely familiar with the works of our regular contributors Walt Amses and Willem Lange. While their topics can be far-ranging, o…

This is what the Bangor Daily News had to say about Maine needing to better diversify its energy sources to lessen future price spikes:

Vermonters who love the outdoors know just how amazing a place our state truly is.

Given the stressors of the current political climate, you would have to be very committed to public service to decide to serve. There are more responsibilities serving in local and state offices and there are also more calls for transparency and accountability.

This is what The Des Moines (Iowa) Register had to say on threats against election workers and democracy:

Since the surge in cases across Vermont, we have been troubled by the COVID numbers.

When it comes to the world today, a print newspaper — especially a local one, that, covers issues like school board and select board meetings or high school sports or the surprisingly significant challenges of getting a town’s dog park open or the retirement of a longtime civil servant might…

The dean of the U.S. Senate has announced it is time to step aside and not seek a ninth term.

While some called it a stunt, Brenda Siegel and Josh Lisenby (and others along the way) put faces to the struggle of homelessness in the face of adverse weather conditions.

This is what The Houston Chronicle had to say this week on the Glasgow climate summit, youth and hope:

Barre set aside political bickering and pettiness to agree to hang a giant flag across the heart of downtown this week. Bickering aside, that giant American flag (and every American flag) serves as an appropriate backdrop and reminder of this day.

This is what The New York Times had to say about last week’s national election results:

Five Questions With

Just over three months ago we started “Five Questions With ...” to put a human face to this pandemic. Today marks the final installment in this stage of the project, but it will continue with a new set of questions more focused on Vermont’s recovery. Here, Paul Costello, of Montpelier, offer…

Marlee Brunton, of Middlesex, talks about the pandemic and its effects on her family.

Marlee Brunton, of Middlesex, talks about the pandemic and its effects on her family.

Alayna Martel, of Barre Town, is a registered nurse at UVM Medical Center. She talks about how, as a frontline workers, her life has been affected by the pandemic.

Alayna Martel, of Barre Town, is a registered nurse at UVM Medical Center. She talks about how, as a frontline workers, her life has been affected by the pandemic.

Gayle Townsend-Lang, of Rutland, works full time wearing many hats for the Rutland City Public Schools as “Miss Gayle.” Here she talks about how she has been affected by the pandemic.

Yankee Notebook columnist Willem Lange, of East Montpelier, talks about how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

Yankee Notebook columnist Willem Lange, of East Montpelier, talks about how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

CPA Thomas Lauzon, of Barre, discusses how his life has been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation. Earlier this spring Lauzon was named to the governor’s Economic Mitigation & Recovery Task Force.

Chrispin White, of Rutland, discusses how he has been adapting to self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting him.

Chrispin White, of Rutland, discusses how he has been adapting to self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting him.

Christina Sweet, of Rutland, discusses how she and her family have been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation over these months.

Christina Sweet, of Rutland, discusses how she and her family have been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation over these months.

Educator and Vermont Mountaineers General Manager Brian Gallagher, of East Montpelier, discusses how the pandemic has affected his life. Earlier this spring, the Mountaineers’ organizers announced they would cancel the 2020 season.

Cat Heatley, of Rutland, talks about how her life has been affected by the pandemic in recent weeks.

Cat Heatley, of Rutland, talks about how her life has been affected by the pandemic in recent weeks.

Salon owner and fitness instructor April Rogers Farnham, of Plainfield, talks about how she has been affected by self-isolation.

Barre Partnership Executive Director Tracie Lewis talks about self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting her life.

Montpelier writer Thomas Greene discusses how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

Montpelier writer Thomas Greene discusses how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

Drew Smith, of Rutland, talks about self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected his life.

Drew Smith, of Rutland, talks about self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected his life.

Jessica Van Orman talks about her experience in self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected her life.

Artist Jen Rondinone, of Rutland, reflects on self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected her and her family.

Artist Jen Rondinone, of Rutland, reflects on self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected her and her family.

Mark Breen, the “Eye on the Sky” guy from the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury, shares his thoughts in self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting his life.

Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe discusses how self-isolation and the pandemic have affected his life.

Executive Director of the Paramount Bruce Bouchard, of Rutland, talks about how his life has been affected by the pandemic and its consequences.