Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice is taking an additional step to further protect the health and safety of our employees and community. As of next Friday, Oct. 1, CVHHH will require all employees (clinicians, administrative, part-time and per-diem staff, and volunteers) to be fully v…

In September, as summer yields to fall, most of the colorful birds that breed in our region during spring and summer head south for warmer locales. The departure of ruby-throated hummingbirds, Baltimore orioles, migratory woodpeckers and numerous warblers doesn’t leave us entirely without st…

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When you picture a conserved land in Vermont, a classic image that comes to mind is expansive mature forests, rocky outcroppings and panoramic views. It’s exactly what is found on the Burnt Mountain property, a recently conserved parcel that is now the largest among The Nature Conservancy’s …

September is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month, a national recognition established by the Foundation for Women’s Cancer in 1999. It is estimated that this year, 98,000 women will be diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer and some 30,000 will die from the disease. Gynecologic Cancer Awareness M…

It’s hard to believe it was just a few short decades ago when life here in Vermont didn’t really have much to do with the rest of the world. Days went on, as the sun rose and set and whatever news we got came in small doses and mostly at a time of our choosing. Times have changed, we live in…

September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, with 191,930 new cases diagnosed last year in the U.S. It is the second most common cause of cancer death (33,330 deaths in 2020) after lung cancer. The good news is that we can screen fo…

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Monarchs are on the move! It is time for their long trip to Mexico to spend the winter. And like marathon runners, they need to bulk up on calories before the event. You may have let a patch of milkweed grow on the edges of your property to support them. That is great, and many of us have do…

Editor's note: Due to a formatting error in production, Susan Jeft's column did not reproduce correctly in the Weekender. We are republishing it here in its entirety with apologies to both Jefts and poet Toussaint St. Negritude. 

It’s unthinkable to imagine that at a time when your loved one needs care and compassion the most, they might become the victim of a heartless scam. But research shows people who are in hospice care in the final months of their lives are often the victims of Medicare fraud.

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While vacationing recently on the Maine coast, I admired many nice gardens. Many of them had hedges or fences, more than I am used to seeing in rural New Hampshire.

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Are you one of those people who loves rhubarb pie, cake, sauce and even preserving rhubarb for off-season use?

I have often been stopped in my tracks by the sight of a white-tailed doe standing in the lush summer grass. Depending on the sun’s slant, the animal’s coat is a rich shade of rusty brown or burnt orange. More delightful still is the sight of a fawn, reddish brown with scattered white dots. …

The morning came up gray and dull, with little wind. The gray squirrels, not due for perhaps another half-hour, kept to their nests, high up in the trees.

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One recent day did not go as planned, but after starting with sadness, tension and adrenaline, it came to an end with an incredible feeling of happiness.

For nearly half a century Tom Stuwe was called out of his home and bed at all hours and in all kinds of nasty weather. When he got where he was called, he was constantly and consistently splattered with manure, streaked with blood and flecked with gore. He was routinely stomped on, bitten an…

I should have known Kiki wouldn’t stay in her little hatch in the rear deck of the kayak, even though I’d thoughtfully padded it with a big fluffy towel. As soon as we left the dock, I could feel her thrashing around back there and then, out of the hatch, standing on the deck behind me, lean…

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Editor’s note: Welcome to Remember When, a history column by Joanna Tebbs Young. Joanna’s name will seem familiar, as she was a regular contributor to the Rutland Reader. A writing coach since 2009 and trained through the Center for Journal Therapy, she is also a facilitator for Vermont Huma…

Do you grow hostas? Even if you don't know them by name, you'll likely recognize their neat, rounded form in the garden. Hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 3-8, they're popular as a reliable, easy maintenance choice.

There has been enough time, research and review of women who received the COVID-19 vaccine while pregnant or lactating to provide the level of confidence for the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology to recommend that eligible patients get vaccinated. The quick summary is that they h…

Although Ken Burns’s “Muhammad Ali” opens during the age of black-and-white television, Ali’s spirit remains so alive today that it is jarring to see him dancing about in colorless footage as Sonny Liston stalks the ring seeking to land the blow that will shut the kid’s mouth.

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Apple season is upon us, and with it comes the sometimes sweet, sometimes tart, and always crisp and juicy flavors that are the epitome of fall. And don’t even get me started on the smell of them baking. Thankfully, Vermont is full of ways to enjoy them, including picking your own right from…

The grackle appeared early last spring, the day before I put the feeder away (so as not to tempt the bears who would soon be awakening from their winter dens). In the dim light of a cloudy day, this avian visitor seemed at first to be just another blackbird, on the larger side, perhaps, and …

Sepsis is the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to infection which can lead to tissue damage, organ failure and death. Sepsis may occur when there is an existing infection anywhere in your body. Without timely treatment, infections such as a urinary tract infection, pneumonia…

The barred owl was there before I knew he was there. I was scanning out the north window early one morning, hoping to spot a deer or perhaps a flock of turkeys on the gentle sloping hill above the driveway. Not that I see that many critters out my way, but, sometimes, they just show up.

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We tend to think of national parks as important cornerstones in the conservation of nature, and they are. But what if there was a way for individuals, like you and me, to work together to conserve the largest national park in the country? And what if, by doing that, we could take a significa…

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As I walked around the garden recently with my wife, Cindy Heath, she turned to me and said, ”Anybody whose gardens look great at this time of year deserves a medal.” I allowed that we did not deserve a medal. Want to get the medal? Here are some tips I have come up with.

I put the small brown ant I had mounted (but never identified) under a microscope and peered down at it. Two huge, headlight-like eyes stared back at me. That couldn’t be right; ants don’t have eyes that size and shape. I took the specimen to my professor, who initially waved me off with, “I…

Every three years, Rutland Regional Medical Center (RRMC) is required to assess our community’s health needs. The last Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) was published in 2018. The most recent report will be made public on Sept. 1. The findings of the 2021 report show the same priority…

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I recently visited the Nasami Farm in Whately, Massachusetts. This is the plant production facility for the Native Plants Trust, formerly the New England Wildflower Society. I met with Alexis Doshas, their nursery manager. The 75–acre farm produces perennials, grasses and some woody plants —…

You might have started to see notices on Facebook and in your local Front Porch Forum email newsletter about CVHHH’s Poker Run & Raffle for central Vermont families. This is a new fundraising event, which takes place on Saturday, Sept. 18, in Montpelier, and all proceeds raised will bene…

Late August There is this; the evening falls sooner in late August. In late August there is a chill once the sun has lowered. The scent of the grasses is burnished, the pleas of the cicadas, plaintive. The cycle, always the cycle; don’t despair, wear what manifests. Decorate yourself with dr…

Hikers climbing the Northeast’s highest peaks will traverse several different vegetative zones along the way. On the summits, they’ll likely encounter plants so hardy that many also grow in the Arctic, thousands of miles to the north.

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There is no fruit as versatile as a tomato fresh from the vine. Canning the surplus further expands its versatility to hearty winter dishes, sauces, soups and juice.

Traveling along a narrow, paved road just outside of Newbury, New Hampshire, one night last week, watching closely for the bright eyes of a deer, we were surprised to get a good but fleeting look at a large, black figure that had just crossed the road and was hurrying into the woods.

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I recently visited Bedrock Garden in Lee, New Hampshire, and came away feeling refreshed and enlightened. This 37-acre public garden was created on the premises of an 18th-century farm that was purchased in 1980 by artist and garden designer Jill Nooney and her husband, Bob Munger.

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On a cool August morning — slowly lifting fog, light offshore breeze, more bearable than it’d been for several days — the crew and I showed up at the town landing in Kittery Point. The harbor, a working and recreational anchorage, was studded with a mix of fishing boats, yachts and day-sailo…