• In China, Kerry talks N. Korea, regional tensions
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     | February 15,2014
     
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    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, meets with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang at the Zhongnanhai Leadership Compound on Friday.

    BEIJING — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Friday he had won a commitment from China to help bring a belligerent North Korea back to nuclear disarmament talks, even as he butted heads with Chinese leaders over a series of increasingly aggressive steps Beijing has taken to assert itself in territorial disputes with its smaller neighbors.

    Kerry met with Chinese President Xi Jinping and other senior officials as he sought to underscore the Obama administration’s commitment to refocusing U.S. foreign policy on the Asia-Pacific region amid myriad other global priorities. He addressed issues ranging from climate change, human rights and rule of law, to Syria and Iran with his Chinese hosts.

    Speaking to reporters following those talks, Kerry praised China for joining with the U.S. in calling for North Korea to dismantle its nuclear programs and said he urged Beijing to “use every tool at its disposal” to convince its communist neighbor to return to the long-stalled disarmament talks.

    North Korea “must take meaningful, concrete and irreversible steps toward verifiable denuclearization, and it needs to begin now,” Kerry said. “China could not have more forcefully reiterated its commitment to that goal, its interest in achieving that goal and its concerns about not achieving that goal.”

    Kerry said the Chinese officials had told him they were willing to take additional steps to achieve North Korean denuclearization and that both sides had traded ideas for further consideration. He did not elaborate on what those steps were, but a day earlier in South Korea had suggested they could involve reductions in commercial and energy trade between China and North Korea.

    Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, meanwhile, said China would never allow chaos or war on the Korean Peninsula.

    “China is serious on this, as shown not only in our words but in our actions,” Wang said, according to the official Xinhua News Agency.

    While China is North Korea’s only significant ally and main source of economic assistance, the extent of China’s influence, and willingness to use it, is unclear following a purge in the isolated country’s leadership.

    Diplomats say Beijing received no prior warning ahead of the December arrest and execution of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s uncle, Jang Song Thaek, who had been considered Pyongyang’s point man on China affairs and was a strong promoter of free trade zones being set up along their mutual border.

    That came on the heels of Pyongyang’s snubbing of Beijing’s wishes when it conducted a missile test in late 2012, followed by the underground detonation of a nuclear device last spring.

    Jang’s removal was seen as depriving Beijing of its chief conduit into the North Korean regime and in the weeks that followed the leadership found itself at a loss as to how to proceed. A delegation of Chinese diplomats led by the Foreign Ministry’s deputy head of Asian affairs visited Pyongyang last week in a sign that Beijing was attempting to renew dialogue with Kim’s government, although it remains to be seen whether the North was any more receptive to China’s pleas to return to the nuclear talks.

    Those discussions involving the two Koreas, the United States, China, Russia and Japan, broke down at the end of 2008, and U.S. officials say they see no point of restarting talks until Pyongyang shows an authentic desire to make good on its prior commitments to dismantle its nuclear programs.

    A UN Commission of Inquiry, meanwhile, found that North Korea had committed crimes against humanity and recommended that its findings be referred to the International Criminal Court, two people familiar with the commission’s report, due to be released Monday, told The Associated Press. The commission found evidence of such crimes as “extermination.”

    While praising China for its stance on North Korea, Kerry was less sanguine about Beijing’s response to U.S. concerns about its increasing territorial assertiveness, especially as it relates to declaring an air defense zone over contested areas in the East China Sea and suggestions it might do the same in the South China Sea.

    Kerry said he told the Chinese of the “need to establish a calmer, more rule-of-law based, less confrontational approach” with respect to its territorial disputes.

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